{$inline_image}
Paleontology – Pennsylvanian of New Mexico
On this episode of Natures Talk Show Fine Art of Paleontology, our hosts Ken McKeighen and Ken Boorman will be reviewing the Pennsylvanian fossil record of New Mexico.

Nearly 60 percent of New Mexico was covered with sediments deposited in the Pennsylvanian System as shallow seas and sediment-shedding uplifts rippled up and down an area where, formerly, nothing but ancient granite, schist and a few thin outcrops of Mississippian limestone baked in the Paleozoic sun. Basins sagged on the continental crust and made space for mud, sand, and gravel weathered and eroded from the Ancestral Rocky Mountains, which were now practically rotting in the heavy rainfall and tropical weather of the time. Exotic plants and insects thrived and coal swamps darkened the margins of the basins. In times when sea level stood high, the warm seas clarified and marine organisms multiplied, secreting lime and leaving hard parts. Limestone is particularly abundant in the shallow marine shelves that surrounded the basins in New Mexico.

http://www.geologicaljoynewmexico.com/the-pennsylvanian-system-in-new-mexico/
Source: zenolive
Paleontology – Pennsylvanian of New Mexico
zenolive

Paleontology – Pennsylvanian of New Mexico
Tagged on:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Enjoy Natures Talk Show? Please Spread the Word :)